Peter Wallison on Judicial Fortitude

Monday, April 22, 2019

12:00 – 1:30 p.m., Hazel Hall Room 121

What is the proper constitutional relationship between federal courts and federal agencies? To what extent should courts defer to agencies’ interpretations of statutes — and to what extent should courts limit Congress’s delegation of power to those agencies?

In Judicial Fortitude, former White House Counsel Peter Wallison reflects on the modern administrative state, and urges judges to play a more energetic role in judicial review of federal statutes and agency actions.

Mr. Wallison gave remarks on the book, in conversation with Adam White, Scalia Law School Assistant Professor of Law and Executive Director of the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State.

About Peter Wallison

Peter Wallison holds the Arthur F. Burns chair in Financial Market Studies at AEI and is co-director of AEI’s program on financial policy studies. Before joining AEI in 1999, he was a partner of Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP, where he practiced banking, corporate, and financial law in the firm’s Washington and New York offices. He was general counsel of the Treasury Department from 1981 to 1985, and White House counsel for President Reagan from 1986-7. From 1972 -1976, he was counsel to Vice President Nelson Rockefeller. He is the author or co-author of several books, including Ronald Reagan: The Power of Conviction and the Success of His Presidency, and Bad History, Worse Policy: How a False Narrative About the Financial Crisis Led to the Dodd-Frank Act, and Hidden in Plain Sight: What Caused the World’s Worst Financial Crisis and Why It Could happen Again (Encounter books, 2015). His most recent book is Judicial Fortitude: The Last Chance to Rein in the Administrative State. He holds an honorary doctorate in Humane Letters from the University of Colorado.