The Future of Financial Regulation in the Biden Administration

An Event in the Gray Center’s “The Administrative State in Transition” Webinar Series

Thursday, March 11, 2021

1:00 – 2:30 p.m. ET

You can view the video recording below. Listen to the event as a podcast here

On Thursday, March 11, 2021, the Gray Center hosted an expert panel on “The Future of Financial Regulation in the Biden Administration.” This webinar was the fifth installment of the Gray Center’s series, “The Administrative State in Transition.”

The Biden Administration faces immensely consequential policy choices on questions of financial regulation—from the proper regulatory standards to apply to banks for the sake of safety, soundness, and systemic risk; to cryptocurrencies; to the use of financial regulatory agencies to drive policy on non-financial issues. And as the Gamestop/Robinhood saga highlighted, new technologies can radically complicate even old policy frameworks. How will the new administration and Congress confront these challenges?

The webinar confronted these issues and more, featuring the following panel of experts:

  • Peter Conti-Brown, Assistant Professor, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania; Visiting Professor, Columbia Law School (Fall 2020); Nonresident Fellow in Economic Studies, Brookings Institution
  • Kathryn Judge, Harvey J. Goldschmid Professor of Law, Columbia Law School
  • Jennifer J. Schulp, Director of Financial Regulation Studies, Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, Cato Institute
  • Moderator: Adam White, Executive Director, the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State, and Assistant Professor of Law, Antonin Scalia Law School, George Mason University

About Peter Conti-Brown

Peter Conti-Brown is an Assistant Professor at The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Nonresident Fellow in Economics Studies at The Brookings Institution, where he is affiliated with the Hutchins Center for Fiscal and Monetary Policy and the Center on Regulation and Markets. A financial historian and a legal scholar, Conti-Brown studies central banking, financial regulation, and public finance, with a particular focus on the history, institutional design, and policies of the US Federal Reserve System. He is author of the book The Power and Independence of the Federal Reserve (Princeton University Press 2016), the editor of two other books, and author or co-author of many articles on central banking, financial regulation, and bank corporate governance in academic journals and in the popular press. He received a law degree from Stanford Law School and a PhD in history from Princeton. He is married with four children.

About Kathryn Judge

Kathryn Judge is the Harvey J. Goldschmid Professor of Law at Columbia Law School. Professor Judge is an expert on financial markets, financial regulation, and regulatory architecture. She is an editor of the Journal of Financial Regulation, a research member of the European Corporate Governance Institute, and a member of the Financial Stability Task Force sponsored by the Brookings Institute and Chicago Booth.  Prior to joining Columbia, Judge clerked for Judge Richard Posner of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals and Justice Stephen Breyer of the Supreme Court.

About Jennifer J. Schulp

Jennifer J. Schulp is the Director of Financial Regulation Studies at the Cato Institute’s Center for Monetary and Financial Alternatives, where she focuses on the regulation of securities and capital markets. She has testified before the U.S. House Committee on Financial Services, and her writing has appeared in Business Insider, MarketWatch, and others.

Before joining Cato, Schulp was a director in the Department of Enforcement at the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (FINRA), representing FINRA in investigations and disciplinary proceedings relating to violations of the federal securities laws and self‐​regulatory organization rules.

Prior to FINRA, Schulp had been both a lawyer in private practice at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP and a clerk for Judge E. Grady Jolly of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit. She received her J.D. from the University of Chicago Law School, where she was awarded the Karl Llewelyn Cup and the Thomas R. Mulroy Award for Excellence in Appellate Advocacy. She holds an A.B. in political science from the University of Chicago.